Hebron HistoryThe honor of being the first settler in this township belongs to E. W. Brigham, who made his original claim in 1836, and built the first house in the township, constructing it of poles. He was a native of Vermont, as was Josiah H. Giddings, the second settler, who erected the first frame house, and long continued to occupy it, although he later added to its original proportions. Bela H. Tryon was the third settler, coming here in 1836, and residing here until his death in 1848... Read More

Hebron HistoryMajor (his first name) Watson, is believed to be the only Revolutionary War soldier buried in McHenry County. Watson was one of the last survivors of the Revolution. Born on Nov. 18, 1739, in Sackets Harbor, N.Y, He came to the area with his daughter-in-law, widow of Zelotus Watson, from St. Lawrence County, New York, in 1837.

As a young man, Watson was captured by the Indians and held prisoner. At one point he was made to run the gauntlet. "Running the Gauntlet... Read More

Hebron HistoryA man who did much to further the cause of scientific agriculture in this country during pioneer days, and who even introduced progressive farming methods into Japan, was General Horace Capron. The General established a home in Illinois. The old Capron house on a hill near Hebron, in the vicinity of the much-visited lakes region northwest of Chicago, has become a well-known residential landmark.

Horace Capron, whom one biographical reference work designates as "a public-... Read More

Hebron HistoryThe Kenosha and Rockford Railroad (originally the Kenosha, Rockford & Rock Island Railroad), running between its two namesake cities in Wisconsin and Illinois, started in 1861, but was largely abandoned by 1939. This railroad, known as the Kenosha Division, or "KD Line", was merged early on into the Chicago & North Western Railroad. The line ran directly through Hebron Illinois.

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Hebron HistoryThe Linn-Hebron Cemetery is located in Hebron. Highway 173 to Johnson Road, to Hillside Road. It is about 2 miles west of Hebron, Illinois. It is high on the hill and is much larger than it looks from the street. The cemetery was originally plotted in 1860, is still active and has much room for expansion. You can search through the graves at Linn-Hebron Cemetary at this link.

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Hebron HistoryMedal of Honor recipient Elmer Charles Bigelow, (July 12, 1920 – February 15, 1945) , who died saving his ship in World War II was born and raised in Hebron. On February 14, 1945, Bigelow's actions averted tragedy on board the USS Fletcher. While assisting minesweeping operations prior to landings on Manila Bay's Corregidor Island, the USS Fletcher was hit by an enemy shell which penetrated the No. 1 gun magazine, igniting several powder cases.

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Hebron HistoryAlden-Hebron High School is the smallest school to win the Illinois High School Boys Basketball Championship. In 1952, with an enrollment of 98 students, the boys team won the state title with an overtime victory over Quincy. At the time, all Illinois schools competed for a single championship, regardless of enrollment. The town's water tower is painted to look like a basketball in commemoration of the event.

The year was 1952, in a small Midwest Illinois hamlet called... Read More

Hebron HistoryAs of the census of 2000, there were 1,038 people, 390 households, and 271 families residing in the village. The population density was 1,515.9 people per square mile. There were 411 housing units at an average density of 600.2 per square mile. The racial makeup of the village was 97.78% White, 0.39% African American, 0.10% Asian, 1.16% from other races, and 0.58% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 5.30% of the population.

There were 390... Read More